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Pre-Workout Supplements: The Good and Bad

One of the most important things to consider when evaluating your options is that many popular pre-workout supplements are loaded with stimulants. There is nothing wrong with a little caffeine, but most of the pre-workout products on the market contain as much caffeine as five cups of coffee. In addition, many also contain food dyes and artificial sweeteners, with most powders being sweetened with sucralose. While food manufacturing companies and global health authorities have deemed sucralose safe for consumption, most health care providers know that this is not the case.

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Natural Ways to Boost Testosterone

In men, we observe the general pattern of the decreasing of endogenous testosterone with age. However, we commonly see lower testosterone in overtraining endurance athletes, stressed-out execs, and persons with physiological imbalances – testosterone levels rarely decline for no reason. Based on the hype, it would be easy to be fooled into thinking “low T” affects every man, everywhere, and that the only thing to be done about it is to hightail it to a doctor’s office and get a prescription for hormone replacement therapy. Available via injection, skin cream, pills, or a patch, testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) is effective, but it’s not without its risks, some of which are as serious as increased risk for heart disease

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Oil of Oregano – Evidence For The Protective Power Of Carvacrol

In the world of plant-based antimicrobials, oil of oregano shines as one of the most effective agents against a broad range of unsuspecting organisms. Originating from the Mediterranean region, its keen ability to inhibit and destroy a wide variety of organisms is attributed to its high concentration of phenolic compounds extracted from the aerial parts of this herb. The two leading bioactive phenols include thymol and carvacrol, of which carvacrol is the leading counterpart.

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Excessive Sweating, Athletic Performance, and Iodine Deficiency – Is There a Connection?

While working or exercising, do you sweat for an extended period of time? Are you constantly exposed to a hot or humid environment? Do you take pre or post workout supplements and/or a multivitamin to replenish key nutrients lost during exercise? Are you aware that excessive perspiration has been linked to iodine deficiency? Thyroid hormones, thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3), are manufactured in the thyroid gland using iodine.

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Cherries Are Great

Ah, cherries! Whether they’re sweet or sour, fresh or frozen, they’re refreshing, juicy, and fun to eat. Fortunately, they’re good for us, too.[1] Unfortunately, these fruits are often served up along with a hefty dose of sugar, be it in a pie, jam or jelly. Eaten in their whole, unprocessed state, however, cherries have a low glycemic index and provide beneficial nutrients and phytochemicals. Additionally, cherry juice and concentrated extracts have shown potential for improving several health issues. Cherries are native to China, where deliberate cultivation dates back at least six thousand years.

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We Like Garlic

In a world where clickbait headlines and competition for “likes” and “shares” means sensible science is sidelined by sensationalist promises regarding the latest and greatest super fruit newly discovered deep in the Amazon rainforest, it’s nice to know that some of the tried and true, old school workhorses of natural health continue to stand the test of time. It’s even nicer when some of these compounds come in foods that aren’t just good for us, but taste great too. There’s anti-inflammatory rosemary and ginger, blood sugar moderating cinnamon, anti-depressant saffron, and let’s not forget antimicrobial, antifungal, antiparasitic, and anti-thrombotic garlic.

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Your gut bacteria predates appearance of humans, genetic study finds

The evolutionary history of the bacteria in your guts predates the appearance of humans, and mirrors that of our great ape relatives, according to a genetic study. The research suggests that microbes in our ancestors’ intestines split into new evolutionary lineages in parallel with splits in the ape family tree. This came as a surprise to scientists, who had thought that most of our gut bacteria came from our surroundings – what we eat, where we live, even what kind of medicine we take. The new research suggests that evolutionary history is much more important than previously thought.

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Gut Bacteria Spotted Eating Brain Chemicals for the First Time

Bacteria have been discovered in our guts that depend on one of our brain chemicals for survival. These bacteria consume GABA, a molecule crucial for calming the brain, and the fact that they gobble it up could help explain why the gut microbiome seems to affect mood. Philip Strandwitz and his colleagues at Northeastern University in Boston discovered that they could only grow a species of recently discovered gut bacteria, called KLE1738, if they provide it with GABA molecules. “Nothing made it grow, except GABA,” Strandwitz said while announcing his findings[1] at the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology in Boston last month.

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Fungal Infections: A Greater Threat to Health Than You Might Think

Fungal infections kill more people than malaria or breast cancer but are not considered a priority, say scientists. Prof Neil Gow, from the University of Aberdeen, said more than one million people die from fungal infections around the world each year. Yet there are no vaccines and there is a “pressing need” for new treatments, he said. The warning comes as doctors in England say a new strain of fungi is causing outbreaks in hospitals.

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